Rowing FAQ

COVID-19 CURRENT INFORMATION

LPCR continues to restrict boatings to singles and "family" doubles. The attached link is to a Row2K.com article, written in March 2020, which details the safety aspects, from a social distancing perspective, of competitive training in small boats.

Can I Row my Single during a Pandemic?

 

NEW TO ROWING?

 

DO I HAVE TO BE AN EXPERIENCED ROWER TO JOIN THE TEAM?

P10 accepts all levels of rowers to its Junior Team. Additionally, we have one day Intro-to-row sessions and four day Learn-to-Row camps in the summer for both Juniors and Adults. 

DO I HAVE TO TAKE A LEARN-TO-ROW PROGRAM TO JOIN THE TEAM?

No.  P10 welcomes young athletes at any time of the year who are ready to make a commitment to rowing. Contact our Head Coach at headcoach@powerten.org to discuss the whether our program would be a good fit for you or your junior athlete--or what timing makes most sense

IS THE SEASON YEAR ROUND?

Yes, though the Winter rowing programs in Minnesota are comprised of indoor training.

 

Spring, Summer and Fall, our crews are out on the water. We participate in regattas during these seasons. Because the most important "ergattas" (off-water competitions that use rowing machines) are scheduled in February, it is important to build stamina and fitness through the winter months.

IS THIS A COMPETITIVE PROGRAM?

PowerTen is committed to excellence for all in rowing. One component of excellence is training to compete and win in a competitive environment.

ARE THERE HEIGHT AND WEIGHT LIMITS?

In the United States, competitive Junior rowers are organized at a National Level into Lightweight and Openweight categories. Lightweight are under 135 pounds for women, and 155 pounds for men (these numbers are adjusted upwards during the winter season).  To ensure the health of the sport’s young athletes, USRowing, our sport’s organizing body, requires a doctor’s certificate for any Junior rower planning to row as a lightweight,.

WHEN IS THE RIGHT AGE TO START ROWING? 

Rowing is a lifetime sport. Fourteen is a great age to start rowing. In the United States, many rowers come to rowing in high school after they have burnt out of a too-early commitment for a sport that did not hold their passion. For athletes considering collegiate rowing, the winter of 11th grade is an important year to be making a push.

Come try a session and see how you like it!

Contact our Outreach Coordinator at outreach@powerten.org and check us out!

LOGISTICS

 

 

WHAT SHOULD I WEAR?

Spandex shorts (similar to biking shorts) or running tights should be worn to water practices along with a comfortable t-shirt or tank top that doesn’t impede arm movement.

If you don't own a pair of tight-knit shorts or leggings, slim-fit (not baggy) pants or short constructed of flexible material are the next best option.

 

Bring layers, but avoid full-zip style sweatshirts and any clothes with "kangaroo" style pockets low on the shirt-front.

Always bring socks for water practices, and running shoes in case the weather turns bad, and we jog during practice. Don't forget sunblock or sunglasses that either have a strap (or are sized to not fall easily off your head). Some rowers prefer visors or a baseball-style hat.

We recommend that anyone with long hair tie it back in a braid or ponytail. Many rowers wear headbands to keep their hair out of their eyes.

WHY "Close fit" CLOTHING?

It is very easy to snag loose clothing under the runners of a sculling boat's rolling seat or against the oar handles.  Rowing is easier if clothing is not getting in the way.

SHOULD I BRING A WATER BOTTLE?

It is essential to stay hydrated. Water may not be necessary for the first week of practice, but soon after, most rowers progress to the point where they view drinking water in the boat as a necessity,

WHEN DO WE PRACTICE?

In fall, winter and spring the Junior Team practice weekdays after school and Saturday mornings. The Schedule page should have the most up to date details.

WHAT HAPPENS IF WE CAN'T ROW DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER?

P10’s highest priority is to keep its rowers safe. Sometimes weather forces crews to stay off the water.  In the event of inclement weather, we try to alert rowers ahead of time that practice will be cancelled. If advanced notice is not possible, then junior athletes will have the choice to either leave immediately, or stay for socially-distanced land workouts for the duration of their scheduled water time. 

Conditions that may force crews off the water in Minnesota include wind and/or thunderstorms.

 

BASICS

 

WHY ARE THERE SO MANY ROWING TERMS?

In the beginning, it may seem like rowing uses WAY too much complicated terminology. Be assured: no one remembers it all on the first day. USRowing, our sports' organizing body here in the US, has a good glossary (as well as many other resources for both beginning and advanced rowers). It's a great resource for familiarizing yourself with rowing terms.

If you are familiar with some other kind of boating, some of these terms may be familiar (port and starboard, for example). But a racing shell (or boat!) has many parts, as does the human body. It helps a coach to be able to give highly specific instructions that a rower can understand.

WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN "SCULLING" AND "SWEEP" ROWING?

Athletes with two oars -- one in each hand -- are scullers.  Athletes with only one oar are sweep rowers. Currently (Fall 2020) most clubs are not doing sweep rowing, because more people (4 or 8) row together in most sweep boats.

HOW MANY DIFFERENT KINDS OF BOATS  ARE  THERE IN THIS SPORT?

There are six boat configurations: Scullers row in singles (1x), doubles (2x) and quads (4x). Sweep rowers come in pairs (2s), fours (4s) and eights (8s). At P10, we believe that the best rowers give all these boats a try, as opportunities become available.  Rowers need to get used to changing boats, and seats in boats, challenging their technical ability and learning their true preferences. Generally rowers find that they have one or two "seats" that they most enjoy rowing in.

To quote from the USRowing website. "Rowing is the ultimate walk-on sport. It's easier to get started than you think."

 

REGATTAS 

(ADVICE FOR SPECTATORS)

 

ARE  ALL REGATTAS CANCELLED FOR THE FALL 2020 COVID-19 SEASON?

Yes. USRowing is taking a strong stance on this point to protect the health of all rowers.

Organizers are currently holding dates for 2021 events, but the schedule for reopening remains on a TBD basis.


 

ANSWERS FOR MORE 'NORMAL' OPERATIONS

CAN I--SHOULD I?--COME TO WATCH MY ROWER COMPETE?

Absolutely!

WHAT WILL I SEE?

It depends.

Regattas can be a wonderful day spent by the water enjoying a full roster of races, as well as being a great way to be engaged with your athlete.

But--it is important to "know before you go" what it is that you are going to see,  Each Regatta has its own rules, list of events, and accessible viewing points.  Novice athletes may be entered only in a single event, experienced competitors may have as many as six. The entire course may be in view of the stands. Or, more commonly, there are no stands, and you need to make a decision where you want to stage your viewing point. The "put in" where the athletes launch (and land) their boats may be a long way from the best site to view the finish, or the final 500 meters.

HOW LONG ARE REGATTAS?

Again, it depends. Most one day regattas begin operations before 8:00 am and end before 5:00 pm. Schedules may be available at the Regatta Central website. With a local event and a novice athlete, the action may be over by noontime.

 

WHAT SHOULD I BRING?

Parent Packing List
--Water bottle. Most regatta sites have primitive, if any, plumbing.
--Binoculars enhance the spectator experience. The race course is long and seeing up close can make it more fun.
--Camp chairs. Race sites are usually a park along a river or lake. 
--Backpack with an extra garbage bag. If it rains or the ground is wet, just slip your items in the bag to keep dry when storing.
--Blankets. Somehow, there is always a rower looking to wrap up on the chilly days.
--Cash. The regatta sites are often in a park not near an ATM. Some regattas have a parking fee.
--Photos.  We love to share the story. If you capture a great moment, please share with the team.

--Mobile Hotspot. We are sort of kidding on this one, but not really. Often regatta sites have poor internet service, if any.

WHERE CAN I FIND REGATTA RESULTS?

Often there is a centrally located physical bulletin board on site where results will be posted. Other sources include RegattaCentral.com and HereNow.com.

LINKS TO USEFUL VIDEOS

 

There are many useful resources  for rowers on-line. Our advice is to start with the USRowing website, which strives for consistency in its approach.

The following pair of videos are a sample of what's available--covering, not coincidentally, some useful topics.

 
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Lake Phalen Community Rowing aka Power Ten is a 501c3 organization

Tel: 612-743-6358, info@powerten.org

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